Dogs like these are available at the shelter every week, so call the City of Winnemucca/ Humboldt County Animal Control Center and set up an appointment to meet them if considering adoption. Don’t forget to bring other pets, kids, or family members!
Dogs like these are available at the shelter every week, so call the City of Winnemucca/ Humboldt County Animal Control Center and set up an appointment to meet them if considering adoption. Don’t forget to bring other pets, kids, or family members!
Adopting from a shelter gives many very deserving dogs a second chance. Many of the dogs at the City of Winnemucca/ Humboldt County Animal Control Center are waiting for their owners to come pick them up after they’ve wandered too far from home, others are waiting for someone to take them home and love them forever.

 The local animal shelter has seen a decrease in adoption over the summer, according to City Animal Control Officer, Lesley Olmos, and the shelter has been taking in 40 to 60 dogs every month. Of the dogs that do not get reclaimed, many, unfortunately, are not adopted right away, so they stay at the shelter anywhere from 10 to 30 days, or are taken in by rescues, according to Olmos. 

A typical day at the shelter, “is just being in the shelter, waiting for owners to come get them or to be adopted,” said Olmos. 

Rescue shelters are private organizations that take in animals that have been at shelters for extended periods of time and continue to work on finding them homes.

Humboldt County Animal Control Officer, Carrie Micone, explained that the shelter works with many rescues all over the country, from Florida, to Pennsylvania, to Ohio, to help dogs find homes. According to the officers, two dogs were adopted last month and two were rescued. Officer Olmos said that the shelter sees many more dogs get taken in by rescues than those that get adopted. 

Adoption is not always possible for everyone, but there are still ways to help the dogs find homes. Sponsoring the spay/neuter for a dog is an easy way to give a dog an advantage in the shelter. Spaying or neutering animals is proven to reduce aggression, lower overpopulation, lower a dog’s risk for cancer, reduce roaming, and increase lifespan, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). If a dog is already spayed or neutered, it also only costs 10 dollars for someone to be able to bring it home from the shelter. People can also volunteer to help transport dogs once arrangements have been made with rescue shelters. These are both great ways to help the shelter and the dogs. 

“If someone can’t adopt but they still want to help out, actually sponsoring the spay/neuter is a huge benefit,” said Micone, “ or they could help transport them.” 

Another advantage to the dogs is enrichment. Unfortunately, there is not a volunteer program available within the shelter and staff is limited, so finding the means to keep the dogs stimulated proves difficult. Dogs that stay at the shelter can find the drastic change to be a stressful experience. Confinement, separation anxiety, and the unfamiliar environment can lead to kennel stress for many dogs. Officer Micone explained that having toys, food dishes, or other items that are intended to promote stimulation can be very valuable for the dogs. According to the AVMA, kennel stress can cause dogs to misbehave in many different ways, thus, dogs may not be in the best emotional state to make a good impression with a potential family. Enrichment items, as well as other things, are on the list of donations that the shelter would love to receive. 

“Our major need is enrichment, especially if they’re staying for over five days,” said Micone. 

It is important to each dog that they go to a loving home that is a good fit for both family and dog. Some dogs would thrive with the love and affection of a large family, some would prefer a single parent that won’t overwhelm them. It is important to make an appointment to meet the dogs if one is considering adoption. According to the Animal Control Officers, a dog’s tolerance for other animals and pets, as well as people, can only be determined if they are able to collect a history from previous owners. Meeting before adoption helps make sure that homes are the right fit for dogs and people, so other pets, kids, or other household members are encouraged to come to the meeting. To make an appointment to meet a prospective furry family member, call the shelter at (775) 623-6403. 





Shelter wish list:

• Dog food (no Ol’Roy)

• Bully chews/ sticks (no stuffed toys)

• Ice to put in water bowls on especially hot days

• Blankets or towels (only during winter months)