The front of the Hubbard House. The lot was originally owned by the Central Pacific Railroad. Lots 8-11 in block C were purchase for $325 in 1879 by Edward LaGrave from the railroad. In 1884, Pleasant Valley rancher Patrick Sweeney purchased the LaGrave property, who sold it to John A. and Lucy Rogers in 1894. The Rogers family sold lots 8 and 9 to Lorenzo D. Hubbard in 1907. The Hubbard House is a 2-story Classical Revival/Foursquare.
The front of the Hubbard House. The lot was originally owned by the Central Pacific Railroad. Lots 8-11 in block C were purchase for $325 in 1879 by Edward LaGrave from the railroad. In 1884, Pleasant Valley rancher Patrick Sweeney purchased the LaGrave property, who sold it to John A. and Lucy Rogers in 1894. The Rogers family sold lots 8 and 9 to Lorenzo D. Hubbard in 1907. The Hubbard House is a 2-story Classical Revival/Foursquare.
Chairperson for the Winnemucca Historic Resource Commission Chairperson and Humboldt Museum Executive Director for the Humboldt Museum Dana Toth delivered the sad news that the Hubbard House is not salvageable. 

“It is a monster, to put it nicely,” Toth told the commissioners at the March 22 meeting. “There isn't one solid component from foundation through the roof.”

Toth said that as the structural engineer went through the house to determine its condition, two 25-yard dumpsters were filled with debris. As the debris was removed, it became more and more clear how severely damaged the house is. 

“The front half of the house has the framing for the second story running one direction, the back of the house has it perpendicular to that. …There was a fire ... There's one section between the front of the house ... that has cedar shingles supplement for some of the framing. It is Swiss cheese,” Toth said. She recommended the house be demolished "sooner rather than later because there is a growing hole in foundation, ... it is a safety issue."

Lorenzo David Hubbard acquired lots 8 and 9 in 1907 from Patrick Sweeny and commissioned the construction of a 2,254 square-foot building. 

Hubbard was an assayer and metallurgist who plied his trade in Mill City and Winnemucca during the early 1900s. He operated the Winnemucca Assay Office from his new residence but performed the assay work in a building in the backyard. 

The house remained in the Hubbard family until 1946 when Hubbard’s nephew Joe Organ sold the house to Gabriel Marcuerquiaga. Marcuerquiaga and his daughter, Neives, operated a boarding house out of the main house and lived in a cabin in the backyard. The boarding house was known as the Kettle Inn and likely catered to the growing Basque community. 

Neives Marcuerquiaga Garaventa sold the Hubbard House to Harold and Wilma Jones in 1973. It went through a series of owners until the house was sold to Humboldt County in 1989. The county allowed Winnemucca Fine Arts Gallery to occupy the building until the organization dissolved in 2016. 

“I want to say we did our diligence,” Toth said. “We got in there [with] volunteers, elbow grease, blood, sweat and tears ... there are some really tough working people in this community who stepped up and volunteered their time and labor to get this done.”

Toth presented a booklet on the history of the house. It is available through the Humboldt Museum. For more information contact the museum at 775-623-2912.

No immeidate action was taken by commissioners following the presentation.