Sarah Renfroe watches a soccer game with her miniature pig, Charlie.
Sarah Renfroe watches a soccer game with her miniature pig, Charlie.
He cuddles, eats all his vegetables and took to house training like a champ. And, Charlie the miniature pig is an unofficial mascot for the PCHS soccer team.

“I picked him up from a breeder in Oroville, California,” says Sarah Renfroe. “He is only three months old, but so far we know he is a snuggle bug and loves to eat.”

“You have to be careful not to overfeed them,” she adds. “Charlie eats a quarter cup of mini-pig food twice a day and lots of veggies.”

Sarah Renfroe’s daughter, Mikayla, plays on Pershing’s soccer team. So the soccer mom and her mini pig get to as many games as they can.

The American Mini Pig Association says adopting a mini pig is a major commitment. They can live up to twenty years. But if they grow bigger than the breeder promised, many people rehome or abandon them. They continue growing until they are about five years old.

Mini pigs are smart, sensitive animals that form strong bonds with their owners. As herd animals, they need leaders with time to commit to training them. They can be taught to sit, stay, bow, crawl, run through tunnels and weave poles, come, spin, and sort puzzles.

And watch soccer.